Archive

Posts Tagged ‘management’

on other ways of making things happen


I mentioned recently the EFQM model, another tool that, when used well, can serve a useful purpose. For me the great benefit that I got from it was understanding the linkages between ideas and results, the enablers. I have been reading a succession of political biographies and commentaries of late and there are many instances where promises made at the hustings have not been delivered. There are many reasons for this and, in general, it is not because the politician is telling lies. Certainly sometimes they do relying on the fact that we are too gullible to see the truth, but there are three other key barriers.

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on times when thinking is a bad idea


Sounds daft to propose that there are times when thinking is not too clever, but I firmly believe it to be true. I would not advocate it as a blanket strategy, but there are times when being able to block certain thoughts will pay dividends. Read more…

on implementation


Almost anything that you change can be a project, so from simple things within the office to nationwide rollouts I have seen a lot. Some I have been on the receiving end for, in others I have been part of the roll out team and for some I have been the sponsor. Not all have gone well, so let us have a look at why. Read more…

the lockdown log 3


Whilst the lock down is not having a huge impact on life for the Berkshire Belle and I there is a danger that elements of the basic skill set can get atrophied during any period of disuse so the trick is to find ways of using them in this strange world. Read more…

on motivation for leaders


The ability to motivate is one of those traits that we expect in a leader; keeping the team positive, productive and, for at least short bursts, galvanised should be bread and butter to a good leader as should the ability to keep the team’s collective heads up when things are not going too well. Read more…

on waste


Here I am not thinking about green issues or recycling in particular, although these are important and do form part of my thinking on this subject, but the overall issue is of wasting anything. Taking offence has become an international pastime, but we choose whether or not to be offended and my preference is not to take umbrage at almost everything, why, because it is a waste of my time and emotions and the one thing that does offend me is waste. Read more…

on the EFQM model


Back in the early nineteen nineties I was introduced to the EFQM (European Foundation for Quality Management) model and, like many of my peers, I struggled with the company-wide desire to implement it, but one aspect of being taught to use it stuck with me and made an important addition to my management tool box. Read more…

on demotivating people


We all have obsessions and those of us who lead teams may have a few for we are driven people. We like to refer to these foibles as being focussed, having a clear vision or something of that kind, but behind whatever management speak we wrap it up in we are still obsessed.

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on negotiation, part two


One of the early lessons that I grasped in my management career was that you always needed to know what would happen if you did nothing. It may sound odd to an outsider, but a manager is always under pressure to do better and that requires change to some, or greater, degree and to do that you need to know what will happen if you do nothing.
When you go into a negotiation you also need be aware of what will happen if you fail to reach a deal. You will have your desired outcome, your concessions, your drop-dead option, your giveaways and your deal breakers and have a plan to work to. You will have all the intelligence that you can muster on the opposition and, once in the room, have your radar on as you probe and respond to their probes in return. Read more…

on the boss being loose in the building


It was a message that would reach me from time to time in my first major operational role. Out of a workforce of around 700 on site around two thirds of them worked for me and for “The Boss”, who normally only moved from the main entrance to his office and back with the occasional foray to the gents, the canteen or the conference room, to be roaming was both unusual and dangerous. Read more…